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SAN FRANCISCO COMPOSERS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA
Presents "I®ll Be Your Composer This Evening»" at Old First Concerts
Saturday, June 9th, 2007 at 8 pm

Old First Presbyterian Church
1751 Sacramento Street/Van Ness, San Francisco, CA 94109

PROGRAM
 
 

Brian Holmes is a physics professor at San Jose State University, specializing in the physics of musical instruments. He usually composes for voice or chorus. During the last year, he has completed commissions for the Peninsula Women's Chorus, the Peninsula Girls Chorus, Pinewood School, and Castileja School. His opera The Fashion God was performed last May by Fresh Voices VI; the song cycle Updike's Science will be performed by Lara Bruckmann as part of Fresh Voices VII later this month. Next weekend, the San Jose Symphonic Choir will perform two pieces of his in Palo Alto as part of a NACUSA concert; one is a premier.

Brian Holmes

Two Grotesque Songs from Death's Jest-Book    Program Notes

VI. The New Cecilia           Low / High
VII. The New Dodo

Branislav Radakovic, Baritone
Lori Garvey, Contrabassoon

John Beeman studied with Peter Fricker and William Bergsma at the University of Washington where he received his Master's degree. His first opera, The Great American Dinner Table was produced on National Public Radio. Orchestral works have been performed by the Fremont-Newark Philharmonic, Santa Rosa Symphony, and the Peninsula Symphony. The composer's second opera, Law Offices, premiered in San Francisco in 1996 and was performed again in 1998 on the steps of the San Mateo County Courthouse. Concerto for Electric Guitar and Orchestra was premiered in January 2001 by Paul Dresher, electric guitar. Mr. Beeman has attended the Ernest Bloch Composers' Symposium, the Bard Composer-Conductor program, the Oxford Summer Institutes, and the Oregon Bach Festival and has received awards through Meet the Composer, the American Music Center and ASCAP. Compositions have been performed by Ensemble Sorelle, the Mission Chamber Orchestra, the Ives Quartet, Fireworks Ensemble, the Oregon Repertory Singers and Schola Cantorum of San Francisco.

John Beeman

Fire Suite     Program Notes

III. Phoenix Rising *  

Loren Jones began experimenting with composition as a child. He spent his early years dividing his time between film-making and music, and some of his film work was periodically broadcast on local San Francisco television. Eventually choosing to pursue music instead of film, Loren formed and was part of several bands performing and creating different genres of original music. To this point largely self-taught, in the 1980's Loren returned to serious study to acquire greater depth musical education in order be able to create the kind of music that he had always been the most passionate about. Loren has studied with Tom Constantine, Alexis Alrich and is currently working with David Conte at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, where he is also a member of the chorus. 

His music has been performed by his own chamber group, by the San Francisco Composers Chamber Orchestra, and by students and teachers from around the Bay Area. He has produced several recordings, worked in radio and film, including creating the sound track for an animated short which won a special Academy Award. His 2006 release, Woodward's Gardens, features two guitars, piano, flute, oboe, harp, and cello.  He was the recipient of a 2007 Meet the Composer Grant. His project, Dancing on the Brink of the World, a fourteen movement piece for chamber orchestra and period instruments, on the history of San Francisco, has been an ongoing part of the repertoire of the past three seasons of SFCCO concerts. 

Loren Jones

Dancing On the Brink of the World San Francisco - 1600 to The Present   Program Notes

10. Golden Gate Bridge - 1930's *

intermission

 

The multi-instrumentalist Michael Cooke is a composer of jazz and classical music. This two-time Emmy, ASCAPLUS Award and Louis Armstrong Jazz Award winner plays a variety of instruments: you can hear him on soprano, alto, and tenor saxophones, flute, soprano and bass clarinets, bassoon and percussion. A cum laude graduate with a music degree from the University of North Texas, he had many different areas of study; jazz, ethnomusicology, music history, theory and of course composition. In 1991 Michael began his professional orchestral career performing in many north Texas area symphonies. Michael has played in Europe, Mexico, and all over the United States. Cimarron Music Press began published many of Michael's compositions in 1994. After relocating to the San Francisco Bay Area, he has been exploring new paths in improvised and composed music, mixing a variety of styles and techniques that draw upon the creative energy of a multicultural experience, both in and out of America. In 1999, Michael started a jazz label called Black Hat Records (blackhatrecords.com) and is currently on the Board of Directors of the San Francisco Composers Chamber Orchestra. The San Francisco Beacon describes Michael's music as "flowing out color and tone with a feeling I haven't heard in quite a while. Michael plays with such dimension and flavor that it sets (his) sound apart from the rest." Uncompromising, fiery, complex, passionate, and cathartic is how the All Music Guide labeled Michael's playing on Searching by Cooke Quartet, Statements by Michael Cooke and The Is by CKW Trio. His latest release, An Indefinite Suspension of The Possible, is an unusual mixture of woodwinds, trombone, cello, koto and percussion, creating a distinct synergy in improvised music that has previously been untapped.

Michael Cooke

Ha-Me'aggel (one who draws circles) for Orchestra *     Program Notes

Michael Cooke, Alto Sax                     Low / High

Jonathan Russell writes music for a wide variety of ensembles, from orchestra to chorus to rock band. His works have been performed by numerous ensembles, including the San Francisco Symphony, Berkeley Symphony, Harvard-Radcliffe Orchestra, Woodstock Chamber Orchestra, Empyrean Ensemble, the new music bands FIREWORKS and Capital M, and pianists Sarah Cahill and Lisa Moore. Important influences on his work include Johannes Brahms, Gustav Mahler, Igor Stravinsky, Olivier Messiaen, Charles Mingus, Steve Reich, Guns N' Roses, Radiohead, Cornelius Boots, Ryan Brown, Ben Gribble, klezmer music, and free improvisation. Also active as a performer on clarinet, bass clarinet, and alto saxophone, Jonathan is a member of the heavy-metal inspired Edmund Welles bass clarinet quartet and the Balkan/Klezmer/Experimental band Zoyres. He also plays in, composes for, and is a founding member of the Sqwonk bass clarinet duo, and freelances in the Bay Area as a classical and klezmer clarinetist. Jonathan teaches Theory and Musicianship at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, serves as Music Director at First Congregational Church, San Francisco, and is a critic for the San Francisco Classical Voice. He has a BA in Music from Harvard University and an MM in Composition from the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. His composition teachers have included Dan Becker, Elinor Armer, Eric Sawyer, John Stewart, and Eric Ewazen.

Jonathan Russell , Clarinet

Alexis Alrich is presently living in Hong Kong but visits the Bay Area frequently. Her Marimba Concerto, which was presented by the SFCCO, will be played by the Plymouth Symphony in Plymouth, Michigan in 2009 with conductor Nan Washburn. Her piece Island of the Blue Dolphins was performed by the Santa Barbara Symphony on January 19, 2007. She attended an artists' colony in 2007, I-Park in Connecticut, where she wrote Fragile Forests II: Cambodia, next in the series after Fragile Forests I: California Oaks, which was premiered in December 2006 by the San Francisco Composers Orchestra. As one of the winners of a Continental Harmony grant from the American Composers Forum she has written a piece for chorus, orchestra and soloists for the state of Maine. Avenues, her first orchestra piece, was premiered by the Women's Philharmonic and has been played around the country. Her chamber compositions have been performed by members of the San Francisco ballet, opera and symphony orchestras and ensembles including Bay Brass, City Winds, the Ahlert and Schwab guitar and mandolin duo in Germany, the Ariel Ensemble, New Release Alliance and Earplay in San Francisco. Ms. Alrich is the director of the John Adams Young Composers program in Berkeley, California. This is an intensive training program for composers ages 9-18 in honor of and under the aegis of John Adams.

Alexis Alrich , Piano
Victor Flaviani, Timpani

Harry Bernstein has been involved in San Francisco Bay Area music for many years as a composer, performer and teacher. He began his musical training on the trumpet, later learning the recorder as well as the Baroque the modern flutes. More recently, his life has been altered by the invasion of a viola. This occurred a few years after Bernstein began his association with City College. Why take up a stringed instrument in one's fifties? In his case, he took on the challenge of learning the viola in order to explore both orchestral and chamber music, and to learn how to write more effectively for strings. Not long after earning a D.M.A. in early music performance from Stanford University, he moved 30 miles north to San Francisco where he has lived ever since. He has studied composition with Jerry Mueller and has written vocal and instrumental music. Bernstein is co-founder of the Golden Age Ensemble, a duo presenting varied programs of instrumental and vocal music around the Bay Area and is a partner in Micro Pro Musica Press, SF, which offers music engraving, arranging and transcription services. He is currently active with the San Francisco Composers Chamber Orchestra (flute), the Bay Area Rainbow Symphony (viola), and that unpredictable composers' circle known as Irregular Resolutions. Bernstein is an instructor in both the Music and Older Adults Departments at City College of San Francisco, and also teaches privately.

Harry Bernstein

Grace under Fire *     Program Notes
March of Destiny * 

Gary Friedman was born in 1934 and raised in University Heights, a suburb of Cleveland, Ohio, Gary Friedman received his higher education at Antioch College, The University of Chicago (B.S. and M.D. degrees), and Harvard University (M.S. degree). His main career has been as a physician-epidemiologist. He worked in the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research for 30 years including 7 years as its Director. Since retiring from Kaiser Permanente in 1999, his current position is Consulting Professor, Stanford University School of Medicine. Dr. Friedman's musical education started with piano at age 5. He also played trumpet in junior high and high school and studied organ and music theory during teen age. Playing and improvising on the piano only occasionally during adulthood, he returned to music seriously at age 54, studying oboe and English horn with Janet Popesco Archibald. He currently plays these instruments in the San Francisco Civic Symphony, the College of Marin Symphony, the Bohemian Club Band and chamber groups. Starting at age 64, he studied composition for four years with Alexis Alrich in the Adult Extension Division of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. His musical compositions, mostly chamber works, are described in his music web site www.garyfriedmanmusic.net.

Gary Friedman

Trumpet Concerto *    Program Notes

Brian Hertz, Trumpet

Allan Crossman has written for many soloists and ensemble. The North/South Consonance (NYC) recording of Millennium Overture Dance received a GRAMMY nomination in 2003; Music for Human Choir (SATB) shared Top Honors at the Waging Peace through Singing Festival; North/South recently recorded his FLYER (cello and string orchestra, with soloist Nina Flyer); and a recent commission is the piano trio Icarus, for the New Pacific Trio (San Francisco).

One of his many theatre scores, The Log of the Skipper's Wife, was produced by the Royal Shakespeare Company at Stratford and the Kennedy Center, with Crossman's music drawn from Irish/English shanties and dances. His music is the soundtrack for the award-winning animated short, X man, by Christopher Hinton (National Film Board of Canada). His work has been supported by such organizations as Canada Council for the Arts, American Composers Forum, and Meet the Composer (NY). Professor Emeritus, Concordia University (Montreal), he has also taught at Wheaton College, the Pacific Conservatory, and is presently on the faculty of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. His doctoral studies were with George Rochberg, George Crumb, and Hugo Weisgall at the University of Pennsylvania.

Allan Crossman

Earth March *    Program Notes


*These pieces were made possible by a Creative Connections Award from Meet The Composer.

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PERFORMERS
 

Flute
Bruce Salvisberg
Harry Bernstein

Oboe
Philip Freihofner

Clarinet (Bass Clarinet**)
Jon Russell **

Alto Saxophone
Michael Cooke

Bassoon (ContraBassoon**)
Michael Cooke
Michael Garvey
Lori Garvey**


French Horn
Brian Holmes
Anna Newman

Trumpet
Erik Jekabson

Trombone
Jen Baker

Euphonium
Christopher Carrasco

Piano
Alexis Alrich
Davide Verotta

Percussion
Victor Flaviani
Anne Szabla
Christopher Carrasco



Violin I
Clare Twohy

Violin II
Hande Erdem

Viola
Beeri Moalem

Cello
Farley Pearce

Bass
John Beeman

 

 

Brian Hertz studied trumpet at the University of Michigan and the Mannes College of Music. His teachers have included Gerard Schwarz, William Vacchiano, Mel Broiles and Robert Helmacy. He has attended the Eastern, Aspen, and Waterloo Music festivals. He has lived in the Bay Area since 2002, and has performed with various Bay Area ensembles.

Branislav Radokovic was born in Serbia, Yugoslavia, where he completed elementary and music high school. He graduated from the Music Academy of the University of Eastern Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, with degrees in general music pedagogy (2002) and voice ( 2003). He has performed baroque music in Berlin, Germany and in Perast, Montenegro. He has also performed with the Belgrade Opera Studio (Betto - Gianni Schichi, Adolfo - Agenzia Matrimoniale). He has also been active as a composer and as a conductor. He currently directs the choir of Holy Trinity Serbian Orthodox Church in Moraga.

Two Grotesque Songs from Death's Jest-Book Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1803-1846) attended Oxford and showed early promise as a writer. But he abandoned writing and left for Europe to study medicine. He was obsessed with the idea of discovering the secret of life and death. (This was, after all, the era when Mary Shelley was writing Frankenstein.) If he ever discovered the secret of life, he failed to reveal it before or after he committed suicide. His preoccupations are evident in his play Death's Jest-Book, a work which he never completed. The play is filled with many lyrics, including these two grotesque songs. The New Cecilia tells how the wife of Saint Gingo is granted the miraculous power of farting hymns. The New Dodo embodies the themes of death and rebirth which are so important in Death's Jest-Book. In this song, an aborted fetus imagines coming back to life as any one of a number of creatures: a crocodile, a hedgehog, and a snake are among the possibilities considered. But none of these is sufficient, so it decides to be reborn as a New Dodo, and imaginary being with the attributes of many creatures. These songs were among fifteen songs and choruses written for a production of Death's Jest-Book in 2003. The play was performed at UCLA, Fordham University, and in Grasmere, England on the 200th anniversary of Beddoes' birth.

VI. The New Cecilia

Whoever has heard of St. Gingo
Must know that the gipsy
He married was tipsy
Each day of her life with old Stingo.

And after the death of St. Gingo
The wonders he did do
Th'incredulous widow
Denied with unladylike lingo.

"For St. Gingo, a fig and a feather-end!
He no more can work wonder
Than a clyster-pipe thunder
Or I sing a psalm with my nether-end."

As she said it, her breakfast beginning on
A tankard of home-brewed inviting ale,
Lo! the part she was sitting and sinning on
Struck up the old hundredth like a nightingale.

The creature seraphic and spherical,
Her firmament, kept up its clerical
Thanksgivings, until she did aged die.
Cooing and praising and chirping alert in
Her petticoats, swung like a curtain
Let down at the end of a tragedy.

Therefore, ladies, repent and be sedulous
In praising your lords, lest, ah! well a day!
Such judgement befall the incredulous
And your latter-ends melt into melody.

VII. The New Dodo

Squats on a toad-stool under a tree
A bodiless childfull of life in the gloom,
Crying with frog-voice, "What shall I be?
Poor unborn ghost, for my mother killed me
Scarcely alive in her wicked womb.
What shall I be? shall I creep to the egg
That's cracking asunder by yonder Nile,
And with eighteen toes
And a snuff-taking nose
Make an Egyptian crocodile?
Sing, "Catch a mummy by the leg
And crunch him with an upper jaw,
Wagging tale and clenching claw;
Take a bill-full from my craw,
Neighbor raven, caw, O caw,
Grunt my crocky, pretty maw!

Swine, shall I be one? 'Tis a dear dog:
But for a smile, and kiss, and pout,
I much prefer your black-lipped snout,
Little, gruntless fairy-hog,
Godson of the hawthorn hedge,
For, when Ringwood snuffs me out,
And 'gins my tender paunch to grapple,
Sing, "Twixt your ankle's visage wedge,
And roll up like an apple."

Serpent Lucifer, how do you do?
Of your worms and snakes I'd be one or two
For in this dear planet of wool and of leather
'Tis pleasant to need no shirt, breeches or shoe,
And have arm, leg, and belly together,
The aches your head, or are you lazy?
Sing, "Round your neck your belly wrap,
Tail-a-top, and make your cap,
Any bee or daisy."

I'll not be a fool like the nightingale
Who sits up all midnight without any ale,
Making a noise with his nose:
Nor a camel, although 'tis a beautiful back;
Nor a duck, notwithstanding the music of quack
And the webby, mud-patting toes.
I'll be a new bird with the head of an ass,
Two pig's feet, two men's feet, and two of a hen;
Devil-winged; dragon-bellied; grave-jawed, because
Grass is a beard that's soon shaved, and grows seldom again
Before summer; so cow all the rest;
The new Dodo is finished. O! come to my nest.

The Fire Suite: Phoenix Rising is the final movement of a three movement orchestral suite called “Fire Suite.” The first two movements, Smoke and Mirrors and Ashes Falling were previously premiered by the San Francisco Composers Chamber Orchestra. The story of the mythical phoenix bird rising from the ashes is not only found in the Judeo-Christian tradition, but also occurs in many other cultures including Egyptian, Greek, Chinese and Indian. Phoenix Rising begins with slow, mysterious music which brings to mind crackling, sizzling ashes. This section gradually builds layer upon layer as it finally grows into a huge crescendo. The Allegro commences as the phoenix takes wing soaring above a driving bass line. Soon a new joyful section is heard in the brass which using a hemiola rhythm. This transforms into a similar figure in the woodwinds which modulates through many variations. Now an energetic fugue based on the earlier bassoon line begins. This quickly combines with previous melodic and rhythmic passages as it reaches a forceful conclusion. This piece was made possible by a Creative Connections Award from Meet The Composer.

Dancing on the Brink of the World: San Francisco - 1600 to The Present, a 14 Movement piece on the history of San Francisco - 1600 to the Present. Seven other movements have been performed in previous SFCCO concerts. This piece was made possible by a Creative Connections Award from Meet The Composer.

10. Golden Gate Bridge - 1930’s

The Golden Gate Bridge was completed after more than four years of construction at a cost of 35 million dollars, and opened on May 28,1937, ahead of schedule and under budget, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt pressed a telegraph key in the White House announcing the event. The bridge's 4,200-foot long main suspension span was a world record that stood for 27 years. It’s design features an Art Deco theme. Wide, vertical ribbing on the horizontal tower bracing accents the sun's light on the bridge, and the towers that support the suspension cables are smaller at the top than at the base, emphasizing the tower height of 500 feet above the roadway. On opening day my father was the first motorcycle rider to cross the bridge, and 50 years later, in his 80's, he led the 1987 anniversary parade, once again on a motorcycle. The Golden Gate Bridge is a beautiful work of art, as well as one of the world's greatest modern architectural masterpieces. The music here reflects not only the grandeur of the completed bridge, but also it’s construction.

Ha-Me'aggel (one who draws circles) for Orchestra was originally written for my quintet (woodwinds, trombone, cello, koto and percussion), the Cooke Quintet. The group recorded this work on An Indefinite Suspension of The Possible released on my label Black Hat Records. It has four sections, which in the original version could be played in any order, a form known as circle music. I felt that this piece would adapt well as a Concerto for Saxophone or Orchestra, though I had to make the form less flexible for an orchestra. There is some freedom to allow different instruments be featured but in tonight’s concert alto sax (Michael Cooke), clarinet (Jonathan Russell), piano (Alexis Alrich) and timpani (Victor Flaviani) are featured instruments. The melodies in the piece were written using a Klezmer scale, which made me think of the story of Onias (Honi) Ha-Me'aggel, a first century Jewish scholar who drew a circle and placed himself in the center of it, praying for rain and whose prayers were mysteriously and immediately answered. My prayers where also answered, as this piece was made possible by a Creative Connections Award from Meet The Composer.

Grace under Fire, written for flute and piano, is inspired by a cancer episode as well as by the healing process enhanced by "Art for Recovery," an art therapy program at UCSF-Mt. Zion cancer center. The main theme recurs several times in the piece, never quite ending where it should. Finally, the last statement in the piano, joined by a kibbitzing flute, brings this musical and personal journey to a close. That journey had been at times both reflective and searching, concluding in a positive manner--marked "clear sailing."

March of Destiny may seem to be a grandiose title for a piece proceeding mostly in a regular rhythm of four beats per measure following an introductory fanfare. It appears to have been inspired by the unending high school graduation ceremonies at which I played a bit too often, where the marching graduates heard endless processionals, including the Huldigung's March (or Hommage March) from Edvard Grieg's "Sigurd Jorsalfar" Suite. The nobility of the model is here undercut by the dissonant and slightly mocking setting. These pieces were made possible by a Creative Connections Award from Meet The Composer.

Trumpet Concerto I love trumpet concertos, especially the one by Joseph Haydn. So I thought I would try writing one. The first and third movements are lively. The second is slow and melodic and has been the favorite of soloists who have played it. The style is tonal and fairly traditional—audiences would have been comfortable listening to it 150 years ago. The piece is more difficult to play than I expected, mainly because it gets into a high register fairly often. Previous soloists have used trumpets in E flat, B flat, and C, respectively, and I understand that Dr. Hertz will use a piccolo trumpet, which plays one octave higher than the standard B flat trumpet. Hitting high notes is difficult on any trumpet. The range of the piccolo trumpet does not cover a few of the original low notes so we made a few adjustments to the score.
Earth March, for chamber orchestra, was composed between 1993 and 2007. The piece sets out to reflect the movements of the earth, as though, from orbit, one can see and feel not only the vibrating turbulence, spinning, twirling of the planet itself but also the people in constant motion – from joyous dancing to dark turmoil. So the music is often driven and manic; but there are also quieter passages of reflection and poignancy, sometimes mixed with an undercurrent of intensity and unpredictability - in other words, our own range of experience. During the first sketches years ago, I imagined that we could home in on small segments of the planet’s surface and actually see migration, conflict, celebration, …and here we are in 2007 – Google Earth. (Maybe that’s a better title now…) This piece was made possible by a Creative Connections Award from Meet The Composer.

Mark Alburger Dr. Mark Alburger is the Music Director, Conductor and founder of the San Francisco Composers Chamber Orchestra. Mark is an eclectic American composer of postminimal, postpopular, and postcomedic sensibilities. He is the Music Director of Goat Hall Productions / San Francisco Cabaret Opera, Editor-Publisher of 21st-Century Music Journal, an award-winning ASCAP composer of concert music published by New Music, Instructor in Music Theory and Literature at Diablo Valley College, Music Critic for Commuter Times, author, musicologist, oboist, pianist, and recording artist.

Dr. Alburger studied oboe with Dorothy Freeman, and played in student orchestras in association with George Crumb and Richard Wernick. He studied composition and musicology with Gerald Levinson, Joan Panetti, and James Freeman at Swarthmore College (B.A.), Karl Kohn at Pomona College, Jules Langert at Dominican College (M.A.), Tom Flaherty and Roland Jackson at Claremont Graduate School (Ph.D.), and Terry Riley.
       Since 1987 he has lived in the San Francisco Bay Area, initially producing a great deal of vocal music with assembled texts, including the opera Mice and Men (1992), the crisis-madrigal collection L.A. Stories (1993), the rap sheet For My Brother For My Brother (1997), and the hieratic Passion According to Saint Matthew (1997).

Since 1997, Dr. Alburger has gridded and troped compositions upon pre-existent compositions ranging from world music and medieval sources to contemporaries such as George Crumb and Philip Glass. To date, he has written 16 concerti, 7 masses and oratorios, 12 preludes and fugues, 20 operas, 6 song cycles, 9 symphonies -- a total of 130 opus numbers and more than 800 individual pieces. He is presently at work on Waiting for Godot and Diabolic Variations.


John Kendall Bailey John Kendall Bailey is an Associate Conductor with the San Francisco Composers Chamber Orchestra and is Principal Conductor and Chorus Master of the Trinity Lyric Opera, Music Director and Conductor of Voices of Musica Sacra, and Artistic Director of the San Francisco Song Festival. In 1994, Mr. Bailey founded the Berkeley Lyric Opera and served as its Music Director and Conductor until 2001. Since then he has been a guest conductor with the Oakland East Bay Symphony, Oakland Youth Orchestra, and Oakland Ballet, and music director and conductor for productions with North Bay Opera, Mission City Opera, Goat Hall Productions, Solo Opera, the Crowden School and Dominican University. From 2002-2006 he was the Chorus Master of the Festival Opera of Walnut Creek. Mr. Bailey is also a composer, and his works have been performed and commissioned in the Bay Area and abroad.

Mr. Bailey also maintains a busy performance schedule as a bass-baritone, oboist, and pianist, and has performed with the San Francisco, Santa Rosa, Oakland East Bay, Berkeley, Redding, Napa, Sacramento, and Prometheus symphonies, American Bach Soloists, Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, the Midsummer Mozart and West Marin music festivals, San Francisco Bach Choir, Coro Hispano de San Francisco, Pacific Mozart Ensemble, California Vocal Academy, San Francisco Concerto Orchestra, Masterworks Chorale of San Mateo, Baroque Arts Ensemble, San Francisco Korean Master Chorale, the Master Sinfonia, the Mark Morris and Merce Cunningham dance companies, Goat Hall Productions, Opera Piccola, the Berkeley, Golden Gate, and Oakland Lyric Opera companies, and many other groups. He has recorded for the Harmonia Mundi, Koch International, Pro Musica, Wildboar, Centaur, and Angelus Music labels.

Mr. Bailey has been a pre-performance lecturer for the Oakland East Bay Symphony and the San Francisco Opera, a critic for the San Francisco Classical Voice, a writer of real-time commentary for the Concert Companion, and has taught conducting at the University of California at Davis.


Michael CookeMichael Cooke is the Promotion & Fundraising Director of the San Francisco Composers Chamber Orchestra and a composer of jazz and classical music. This two-time Emmy and Louis Armstrong Jazz Award winner plays a variety of instruments: you can hear him on soprano, alto, and tenor saxophones, flute, soprano and bass clarinets, bassoon and percussion. A cum laude graduate with a music degree from the University of North Texas, he had many different areas of study; jazz, ethnomusicology, music history, theory and of course composition. In 1991 Michael began his professional orchestral career performing in many north Texas area symphonies. Michael has played in Europe, Mexico, and all over the United States. Cimarron Music Press began published many of Michael's compositions in 1994.

After relocating to the San Francisco Bay Area, he has been exploring new paths in improvised and composed music, mixing a variety of styles and techniques that draw upon the creative energy of a multicultural experience, both in and out of America. In 1999, Michael started a jazz label called Black Hat Records. The San Francisco Beacon describes Michael's music as "flowing out color and tone with a feeling I haven't heard in quite a while. Michael plays with such dimension and flavor that it sets (his) sound apart from the rest." Uncompromising, fiery, complex, passionate, and cathartic is how the All Music Guide labeled Michael's playing on Searching by Cooke Quartet, Statements by Michael Cooke and The Is by CKW Trio. His latest release, An Indefinite Suspension of The Possible, is an unusual mixture of woodwinds, trombone, cello, koto and percussion, creating a distinct synergy in improvised music that has previously been untapped. www.michaelkcooke.com